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Tunnel Under Brecknock And Abergavenny Canal, Llanfoist

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NPRN34951
Cyfeirnod MapSO21SE
Cyfeirnod GridSO2848013000
Awdurdod Unedol (Lleol)Monmouthshire
Hen SirSir Fynwy
CymunedLlanfoist Fawr
Math O SafleTWNNEL
CyfnodÔl-Ganoloesol
Disgrifiad
1. Hill's tramroad tunnel under B and A Canal to coal yard in Llanfoist 1825.

2. Not a tramroad tunnel; Hill's Tramroad (nprn 85860) was carried over the B & A Canal (nprn 85124) on a bridge (nprn 85299). The tunnel carries a footpath, formerly a parish road. Condition: In use
Site visited B.A.Malaws, 19 October 1995.
1999.02.22/RCAHMW/BAM

3. Llanfoist Wharf was where the tramroad from Blaenavon Ironworks and Garnddyrys Forge reached the canal. It was opened in 1822. The canal as a whole was linked to many tramroads and was important for trade in iron, lime and coal. The tunnel predates Llanfoist Wharf and the tramroad as it is shown on early maps as a parish road. It is therefore contemporary with the canal, this section of which was built between 1809 and 1812. The tunnel appears to have been constructed in three phases. The Brecknock and Abergavenny Canal (now known as the Monmouthshire and Brecon Canal) was constructed between 1797 and 1812. Gradually the railway took traffic off the canal and eventually it was bought out by the Great Western Railway. Restoration work began in 1964.

Tunnel-vaulted, on a sloping site from N ramped up to the S. The N entrance has a round-headed arch with voussoirs. Revetments curve round and down on both sides to simple terminal piers. The upper (S) side is extended where Boathouse Cottage, a later addition, was built above it, and has a segmental arched opening to the tunnel. This upper section has been strengthened with modern concrete and steel lintels. The original S entrance is similar to the N with round arch and voussoirs. The S approach has rubble wall to W side and some stone setts in situ. The N side of the tunnel is partly cut through bedrock.

The existence of tram setts in the approach suggests it was at one time a tramroad tunnel, despite the adjacent tramroad bridge.
2001/06/07/H&H/RH